The Mortgage Moment Blog: Free Composting Bins from the City of Tempe, AZ,

Free Composting Bins from the City of Tempe, AZ,

Did you know you could get Free Composting Bins from the City of Tempe, AZ, if you are a resident.  I suggest to all of my clients who purchase homes in Tempe, AZ to consider getting their Free Composting Bins from the City of Tempe, AZ,

It is very easy for residents of Tempe, AZ.  You just can contact the city for a free recycled compost container at 480-350-8265.

Free Composting Bins from the Town of Gilbert, AZ by Shane Cook

I have been a Gilbert, AZ resident for over 11 years now and have been composting for the last 5 or 6 years; ever since I found out they will provide you one of the models above for FREE.  This both reduces the amount of trash we generate for the city to pick up and charge residents for and is a great source of nutrients for the small vebetable gardens we plant around our house. 

How Do I get Free Composting Bins from the City of Tempe, AZ,  Below you can see some Potatoes, Carrots, Radishes, Various leave lettuce and behind the hose are some strawberries.  Yes strawberries, even here in the desert.

Free Composting Bins from the Town of Gilbert, AZ by Shane Cook

It is very easy for residents of Tempe, AZ.  You just can contact the city for a free recycled compost container at 480-350-8265.

 

What can I actually compost?

Mary Owens has a list of 163 things you can compost:  http://www.plantea.com/compost-materials.htm

The Town of Gilbert, AZ suggests:

 

Carbon-RichNitrogen-Rich

(Brown and Dry) (Green and moist)

Straw

Cactus

Sawdust

Wet grass clippings

Pine Needles

Fresh plant clippings

Small branches

Vegetable and fruit waste

Drier lint

Barnyard manures and beddings
Dry grass clippings Spoiled food
Dried plant materials Tea bags and coffee grounds
  Hair, Fur, and feathers

 

What Can't I compost?

Composting Instuctions.com suggests not to compost:

Materials
Carbon or Nitrogen

Details

Ashes (coal or charcoal)
n/a
May contain materials that are toxic to plants.
Cat droppings/litter
n/a
These may contain disease organisms and should always be avoided for composting.
Colored paper
Dog droppings
n/a
Same as cats.
Lime
n/a
Acidity can kill composting action.
Meat, fat, grease, oils, bones
n/a
Do not break down, can coat materials and “preserve” them, can attract pests.
Nonbiodegradable materials
Toxic materials

The also suggest some items that may be composted, but only with "caution and skill"

Materials C/N Details

Bird droppings
Nitrogen
Some bird droppings may contain disease or weed seeds
Diseased Plants
Nitrogen
Make sure your pile gets to at least 135 degrees Fahrenheit for a few days to let it “therma kill” the disease
Milk, yogurt, cheese
Neutral
May attract pests, so put it in the middle to deep into the pile
Weeds
Nitrogen
For best results, dry them out until crunchy, then add them to your compost pile
Sod
Nitrogen
Like diseased plants, make sure your pile gets hot enough to make sure the grass doesn’t keep growing in your pile.

 

Click here for other cities composting programs and gardening related blogging.

 

by,

Shane M. Cook

Entreprenuer, Realtor, Investor

Let me help you put the power of technology to work for you!

 

Comment balloon 1 commentShane Cook • April 25 2011 07:49PM

Comments

City of Tempe now gives ugly broken recycle bins as composting bins. Black bins in this pic are no longer available

Posted by Anon over 4 years ago

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